Latest News

(News - May 7/15)
MESSENGER Finds Evidence of Ancient Magnetic Field before plunging into the surface of Mercury

In an astonishing paper published today in Science, Catherine Johnson and colleagues show that Mercury's magnetic field, generated by a dynamo process in its molten iron outer core, has been in place for at least 4 billion years. Low altitude observations made by NASA's MESSENGER spacecraft revealed evidence of magnetization of ancient crustal rocks on Mercury and record a magnetic field that could also have been much stronger than it is today and potentially older than Earth's field. The MESSENGER spacecraft crashed onto Mercury's last week after running out of fuel at the end of a 10 year mission.
See the UBC-Press articale, the Science link, and a background Science perspective.


(Awards - May 1/15)
2 student awards

The Jack Henderson Prize for best M.Sc. thesis went to Tylor Ambrose
and
The Leopold Gelinas Medal for Best M.Sc. thesis went to Amy Ryan


(News - Apr 22/15)
Douw Steyn quoted in the front page of the Hindustan Times

Douw Steyn assists Delhi community air quality analysis effort in comparing Delhi and Beijing.
Hindustan Times article


(Awards - Apr 20/15)
Paul Smith Awarded the GAC Billings Medal

'The Billings Medal, established by the Paleontology Division of the Geological Association of Canada, is awarded to an individual in recognition of an outstanding long-term contribution to any aspect of Canadian paleontology or by a Canadian to paleontology. The Medal is named in honor of Elkanah Billings, Canada's first paleontologist'.


(News - Apr 15/15)
Garry Clarke and Valentina Radic in Nature Geoscience

In a remarkable paper published on April 6, 2015 in Nature Geoscience ( http://www.nature.com/ngeo/journal/vaop/ncurrent/full/ngeo2407.html), Garry Clarke, Valentina Radic and colleagues show that mountain glaciers in western Canada could shrink by 70% relative to 2005 levels by the end of the century as a result of global warming. The team built a novel high-resolution model that includes ice dynamics and then ran it with a series of climate scenarios covering the twenty-first century. The model suggests that few glaciers in the Canadian Rocky Mountains will persist by 2100, although glaciers in the coastal range of northwest British Columbia could survive "in a diminished state". The team predicts that changes in runoff from the melting glaciers over the course of the century could affect aquatic ecosystems, agriculture, forests, water quality and tourism.


(Awards - Apr 13/15)
Roland Stull is a winner of a 2015 UBC Killam Teaching Prize.

The award recognizes the ability to motivate students and stimulate critical thinking, sustained teaching excellence and development of innovative approaches to teaching methodology and curricula.


(Awards - Apr 10/15)
Mark Jellinek is a winner of a 2015 UBC Killam Teaching Prize.

The award recognizes the ability to motivate students and stimulate critical thinking, sustained teaching excellence and development of innovative approaches to teaching methodology and curricula.


(News - Apr 10/15)
Mark Jellinek was awarded a CFI John Evans Leaders Fund grant

Mark Jellinek was awarded a CFI John Evans Leaders Fund grant to establish Canada's first "Center for Geophysical Mixing in the Earth System" in EOAS. In collaboration with Stephanie Waterman the project will establish an experimental capability to address some exciting questions that span ongoing research in EOAS: Did plate tectonics stimulate the rapid rise of complex life and the emergence of the remarkable biodiversity that characterizes the modern Earth? Do volcanic eruptions modulate or even drive decadal climate variability with dramatic consequences such as the famines that occurred during the Medieval "Little Ice Age"? How do ocean currents deliver heat, salt, oxygen, CO2 and nutrients to fragile ocean ecologies such as the Canadian Arctic shelf, which are vulnerable to effects of climate change?


(Event - Apr 10/15)
Retirement Event for Dr. Douw Steyn

Please join us in recognizing Dr. Douw Steyn for his many years of service at The University of British Columbia and the Department of Earth, Ocean and Atmospheric Sciences.
The event will be held on Friday, April 10th from 1:00-2:00pm at the Pacific Museum of Earth. Please rsvp your attendance in the doodle poll: http://doodle.com/6si88g8i84f7c982


(News - Apr 2/15)
New book from Dr.Steyn: Introduction to Atmospheric Modelling

Introduction to Atmospheric Modelling explores the power of mathematics to help us understand complex atmospheric phenomena through mathematical modelling. The author has thoughtfully chosen a path into and through the subject that gives the reader a glimpse of the dynamics underlying phenomena ranging from a sea breeze through mid-latitude cyclonic disturbances to Rossby waves, mainly through the lens of scaling analysis. Written for students with backgrounds in mathematics, physics and engineering. Published by Cambridge University Press (http://www.cambridge.org/9781107499799).


(Award - Mar 24/15)
Graduate Student Awards

PhD Student Anna Grau won an Outstanding Student Paper Award at the 2014 Fall AGU meeting for a presentation entitled: "A Quantitative Characterization and Classification of Martian Valley Networks: New Constraints on Mars' Early Climate and Its Variability in Space and Time"


(Award - Mar 24/15)
Undergraduate Student Awards

Undergraduate geology student Dave Nuttall won the GAC-PDAC Logan Student Prize for 2015. Congratulations!
The GAC-PDAC Logan Student Prize (replacing the Logan Student Chapters and GAC Book Prizes) is awarded annually to one undergraduate student at each CCCESD-member department. The prize consists of a monetary award, one-year memberships in both GAC and PDAC, and an electronic certificate affirming that the student won the Prize.
Undergraduate students who are selected for the prize should be academically sound, have good leadership skills (e.g. as they pertain to organizing field trips, geology club geo-events, etc.), and have done well at field school or otherwise show proficiency in field techniques.


(News - Mar 12/15)
YWCA Women of Distinction Award Nominee

Congratulations to Dominique Weis who has been officially accepted as a nominee for the Women of Distinction Award in the category 'Technology, Science and Research'. Recognized nationally, the award honours individuals and organizations whose outstanding activities and achievements contribute to the well-being and future of our community. The winner will be announced on May 26th. Good luck Dominique!
More detail about the nominees can be seen HERE.


(Award - Feb 22/15)
Stephanie Waterman winner of prestigious Sloan Fellowship.

Congratulations to Stephanie Waterman, winner of a prestigious Sloan Fellowship from The Alfred P. Sloan Foundation. Awarded annually since 1955 , the fellowships honor early - career scientists and scholars whose achievements and potential identify them as rising stars, the next generation of scientific leaders. Fellows receive $50,000 to further their research. See the press release here.


Also see past front page entries from   2015,   2014,   2013,   2012

Colloquia & Seminars

Oct08 4:00 PM

Hugh Ducklow


Welcome Prospective Students

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The Department administers majors, honours and applied science programs that attract over 300 undergraduate and 160 graduate students. Our programs offer challenges to students at all levels. To learn more see;